Carla Gericke's blog

The 603: A Tip for Your Job Search

When I discovered the entire New Hampshire was covered by one area code, I was strangely delighted. Coming from big cities where the city itself might have a few different codes, this seemed so old-timey, and quaint. But, 603 pride is a New Hampsha thing! (Check out the video, if you don't believe me.)

If you have started your job search in anticipation of your upcoming move, make sure to get a local "603" area code phone number. It will help with the job search!

An FSP participant was kind enough to share her tips for getting that sweet, sweet six-oh-three as part of your journey to be more free:

"How I just got a 603 area code phone number from Indiana for $11 without leaving home:

  1. Purchased Airvoice SIM card for $0.99 including shipping from eBay here.

NH's Low Joblessness: Magnet for Movers?

What are you waiting for? If you have skills, you will find a job in New Hampshire! So says The Boston Globe in this article about New Hampshire's low unemployment rate.

New Hampshire has long boasted some enviable economic statistics: low poverty and crime rates, high median income. And lately, there’s been an especially eye-popping number: an unemployment rate that has dropped to 2.6 percent, the lowest in the country after South Dakota (2.5 percent).

However, not everyone in New Hampshire is cheering the news, least of all employers who are struggling to fill hundreds of vacancies and experts who are concerned the low unemployment number represents a major crimp on economic growth. As impressive as it might appear, the state’s low unemployment rate does not reflect a surge in hiring so much as it does the fact that employers are having to draw on a shrinking pool of skilled workers.

SoapBox Idol Returns to PorcFest XIII

SoapBox Idol will be returning to Roger’s Campground at PorcFest XIII! Conceived in 2009 with the goal to give voice to the community, I had no idea how popular or crazy things would get!

The idea was simple: PorcFest attendees seemed like the type of folks who might be harboring an opinion, frustration, or passion or two (or ten!). I wanted to provide an opportunity to “tell us how you really feel.”

The rules were basic: You had 3 minutes and if you ran over your time, you got shot by a water pistol, and a point was taken off from your score. I lined up judges: Angela Keaton (Antiwar.com), Chris Lawless (Ron Paul’s Friggin’ Giant and Liberty Forum lead organizer) and Gardner Goldsmith (writer and radio host). I was the Vanna White of the night.

Courcruxes: When Everything is Open to Interpretation

FSP early mover Ian Underwood writes a thought-provoking and compelling piece on Granite Grok today about the role of courts in New Hampshire. He starts with the following thought experiment:

"Suppose you buy a car made by General Motors. And there is a problem with the car — the brakes aren’t designed properly, and you’re severely injured in a car crash. So you want to sue GM.

And suppose you’re required to do that in a court that is owned and operated by GM. In particular, the judge and the other officers of the court are employees of GM.

You go to the judge to voice your concern about this. And he tells you: Oh, there’s no conflict of interest, because the court is a separate part of the company.

It’s laughable, right? Because it violates what we might call ‘the first rule of justice’, nemo judex in sua causa: No one can be judge and party in his own case."

Read more on Granite Grok.

Manchester: The Queen's City

The first time I visited Manchester, the largest city in New Hampshire (pop. 110,000), was back in 2006 when hubby and I came up from NYC to attend our first PorcFest, which you should do too!

It was a Sunday, it was dreary out, and Elm Street, the main downtown drag, was depressing as all get-out with boarded up buildings and “Going Out of Business” signs. I hated it. I actually teared up, saying to Louis, “Please don’t ask me to live here.”

At the time, I was still ambivalent about the whole “Move to New Hampshire as part of the Free State Project and work towards ‘Liberty in Our Lifetime’” thing--how life has changed!--and Manchester was not doing Louis’s pitch any favors.

Fast forward a decade: 10 PorcFests, 20,000 signers, and one Trigger the Move later, and I’m happy to report: I love it here! Manchester's economy has improved and downtown is now vibrant, sporting restaurants and shops like Dancing Lion Chocolates that even take bitcoin!

"Yankee Liberty" Needs to Be Conscious Effort

This article is the third and final part in the series on libertarianism and liberty in New Hampshire. Part 1 and Part 2.

From The Dartmouth, America's oldest college newspaper:

"'The Free State Project is a natural outlet for dissatisfaction in the political system,' Merrill said.

'It’s a natural outgrowth of individuals wanting to be certain that government doesn’t intrude in their lives in an unreasonable manner,' he said. 'I have yet to run into any Free Stater who wasn’t patriotic, interested in keeping government at an appropriate size, and willing to do their part. I think those are the kinds of people that will keep New Hampshire the state that it has been and should remain.'”

Read more... Buy your tickets to PorcFest today!

NH Culture Fosters Libertarian Ideals

This article on libertarianism and liberty in New Hampshire is the second in a three-part series from The Dartmouth, America's oldest college newspaper. The final part will be published tomorrow, so stay tuned.

From the article:

"New Hampshire is in Henry David Thoreau’s backyard, a region north of Massachusetts’ Walden Pond where individual responsibility, community cohesion in the small valleys of the White Mountains and personal liberty have always been valued. The small, isolated towns of northern New England may contribute to Alexis de Tocqueville’s concept of “self-interest rightly understood,” the tendency of people to view aiding their communities through private action — for instance, by removing a fallen tree from a roadway without waiting for government agents to do the task for them — as a self-serving goal, helping others by helping oneself."

PorcFest: An Origin Story, Written by Michelle Dumas

Buy your tickets to PorcFest XIII today!

There is something magical about campfires isn't there? Throughout history, some of the greatest ideas, movements and friendships have started around campfires.

A few weeks ago, I was cleaning out a box of old paperwork when I found something surprising and timely, considering that FSP had just announced the week before that the move had been triggered. An old, forgotten notepad on which I had jotted handwritten notes taken at the very first meeting, in late 2002, of the “Welcome to the Granite State Committee” formed by three members of LPNH: Rich Tomasso, George Reich, and me. Our stated goal for the committee was to promote New Hampshire as the best state for FSP members to choose. We were all members of FSP, and were committed to moving if another state was selected, but we passionately believed NH was the best choice.

Independent Streak: Libertarianism in the Woods of NH

The Dartmouth, the daily student paper of Dartmouth College in Hanover, is writing a three-part series on libertarianism in New Hampshire. Here is the first edition.

"On the morning of June 16, it will be just over 60 degrees in Lancaster if average temperatures hold. The city lies on the southern edge of Coös County, near the banks of the Connecticut River. At its heart is a small, insular community cut off from the state around it by forests and mountains stretching out for miles around. At the edge of town, out in the woods, is Roger’s Campground. That morning, the final preparations will be underway in these woods for one of the largest gatherings of libertarians in the world: PorcFest.

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