Blogs

Introducing GenCourtMobile

A friend of the FSP, Seamus Casey, has built a new app to help activists track pending legislation. Here, for informational purposes only, are more details:

Are you a liberty lover wanting to become more active in the New Hampshire legislative process? If so, then there are two things you need to do:

1) become a Full or Lifetime member of the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance;

2) easily and quickly get involved by using GenCourtMobile.

What is the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance (NHLA)? The NHLA is a non-partisan coalition working to increase individual freedom in New Hampshire, primarily focusing on the bills and legislators in New Hampshire General Court (the state legislature).

What is GenCourtMobile (GCM)?
GCM is a mobile app that streamlines the process of tracking bills, committee hearings, legislator voting records, and more.

Not sure which bills to track, or how to track them?
Then simply subscribe to the bill topics you are most passionate about.

90% and Accelerating: The Free State Project Gets Ready to “Trigger The Move”

Over 18,000 Activists Have Pledged to Move to New Hampshire as Free State Project Approaches its Goal

The Free State Project is an unprecedented movement -- once 20,000 libertarians pledge to participate, it will “Trigger the Move,” and they will make their way to New Hampshire within five years. The organization has now exceeded 90% of its goal with more than 18,000 pledged participants, and almost 2,000 “early movers” have already made New Hampshire their new home with fresh faces coming in every week.

“This is the culmination of a decade of work and we’re just months away from reaching our 20,000 participant goal,” says Carla Gericke, President of the Free State Project. “Early movers have purchased about $40 million in New Hampshire real estate, and many have brought businesses and jobs with them.”

NH DOE Fails to Get Injunction Against Croydon re School Choice

On December 14, 2015 the presiding judge of the Strafford Superior Court, Justice Brian T. Tucker, denied the injunction brought by the NH Department of Education and Attorney General against the Croydon School Board. The NH DOE and AG claimed that the four Croydon students would be irreparably harmed if allowed to remain at the Newport Montessori School as part of the town’s school choice program. In the court’s ruling, the judge said that the NH DOE previously allowed students to remain in their private schools and had advance knowledge that the board intended to continue their program in the 2015-2016 school year, but did not take immediate action at those times. The judge cites another case that said “[A]ny delay in moving for a preliminary injunction “generally destroys the presumption of irreparable harm.” See the photos below for a full copy of the ruling.

School Choice Matters, So Drop Croydon Lawsuit Says State Reps

In today's Concord Monitor Representatives Greg Hill, JR Hoell and Michael Balboni weigh in on the ongoing saga of the lawsuit brought by the NH Department of Education against the Town of Croydon over school choice. The state is suing the town, and is seeking injunctive relief to remove the children from their new schools during the school year. A ruling on the injunction is expected this week.

Then why, Gov. Hassan, Attorney General Foster and Commissioner of Education Barry, are you interfering with the Croydon School District’s lawful practice to provide its children with educational opportunities that best meet each child’s needs? Why are you taking the Croydon School District to court and suing the good people of Croydon, who just want to exercise their legal right to provide the best educational opportunities for their children? Croydon is not a large school district with a large tax base and financial resources to mount a prolonged defense against state resources.

Long Road Home (to the 'Shire)

Pete Eyre, co-founder of Cop Block, blogs at Free Keene about why he and his life partner Amanda Billyrock are returning to the 'Shire after an extended travel adventure in search of more freedom.

Amanda and I could continue to globe-trot to see how yet another place stacks up. We could go to Cambodia or somewhere where the likelihood and severity of threats from self-proclaimed rulers may be less, but such purposeful isolation means missing much of the spontaneity, excitement, and potential that would be present were we part of a larger homegroup. Sure, we’d be existing, but would we be living? So after a stop in Mexico City this weekend for the Latin American Bitcoin Conference, we’ll return to the ‘shire. We both recognize it as the best place for us to be right now.

NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden to Headline Free State Project’s Liberty Forum

MANCHESTER, NH: Edward Snowden, the former CIA intelligence officer and NSA contractor who leaked information about illegal government surveillance in 2013, is coming to New Hampshire–live from Russia–during the Free State Project’s 9th Annual Liberty Forum.

Snowden’s disclosures about the NSA illegally seizing the private records of billions of individuals who were not suspected of any wrongdoing launched a historic debate about national surveillance practices. Largely as a result of his efforts, the NSA’s bulk collection of telephone metadata was ended just last week.

Nomads Help at Shire Sharing

The Barfield family, known as Living Nomad Style, have been traveling across the U.S. for the past few years. This year, they decided to drop in on the volunteer-driven private charity, Shire Sharing. Read about their experiences helping to feed thousands of needy folks this past Thanksgiving here.

Photo credit: Living Nomad Style

Drug War Belongs in Dustbin of History

"We can’t solve a problem without knowing its origin. To solve America’s drug problem, we have to know the history of the drug war.

The drug war did not start with Richard Nixon. It wasn’t a Republican idea, or a traditional idea. The drug war was launched before the First World War by utopian Progressive Democrats.

Woodrow Wilson signed the first federal drug law in 1914, the Harrison Act. It was intended as a weapon against opiate-using “Orientals.” Some doctors supported it because it granted them a prescription monopoly. At first, the Harrison Act only increased the cost of opiates to users. But soon the doctors fell victim as well, as the Harrison Act was used to imprison pain doctors and even those who ran opiate-addiction treatment clinics."

Read more from Bill Walker, FSP early mover on the history of the Drug War at The Concord Monitor.

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