• What is the FSP?

    The FSP is an agreement among 20,000 participants to move to New Hampshire for "Liberty in Our Lifetime." We are almost 85% to our goal, after which we will “Trigger the Move."

  • Our Newsletter

    Get the latest news on what's happening in New Hampshire. Subscribe to the FSP newsletter to stay up-to-date with developments. View the latest issue here.

  • Counters

    COUNT(Profile: Member Type)
    16860 16860
    Participants:
    16,860 of 20,000
    Participants in NH:
    1,755
    In-state Friends:
    2,519

Potential of Bitcoin in NH

The Free State Project gets a mention in this Nasdaq article about Bitcoin adoption. The article also quotes early movers, NH representative Eric Schleien, sponsor of the NH bill who "considers Bitcoin payments more secure than credit card payments," and Joel Valenzuela, blogger at The Desert Lynx.

From the article: "At least two states, New Hampshire and Utah, have bills under consideration that would make it possible for citizens to pay taxes and fees in Bitcoin. New York City has proposed similar legislation. The reason? At least a few elected officials recognize the potential of Bitcoin to help government and citizens alike."

NH #1 for Most Financially Literate State

According to a recent study by WalletHub, Money reports that New Hampshire is the most financially literate state. From Money: "New Hampshire pushes its way to the top by having the lowest high school dropout rate, the second lowest non-bank borrowing rate, and the fourth lowest number of unbanked households in the country." Read more...

Photo credit: Alamy as appeared on Money

N.H. in 2035: For the Free State Project, It’s Live Freer or Die

The Concord Monitor covers the Free State Project and discusses some of the projects early movers are working on. "It’s New Hampshire in 2035, as projected by a unique political migration of libertarians intent on creating a state of unbridled liberty. Called the Free State Project, the movement’s founder, Jason Sorens, predicted at a forum this month that a small but dedicated group can punch above its weight in enacting freedom-focused changes and bringing about a destination for businesses and self-sovereignty." Read more...

Photo credit: Geoff Forester/Monitor staff

In Education: Choice vs. No Choice

Early mover Bill Walker weighs in on school choice in New Hampshire in today's Nashua Telegraph. "Education isn’t a left vs. right issue. It’s a choice vs. no-choice issue." Read more...

Bill Walker is a member of the Sullivan County Republican Committee. He thanks his mother, a public school teacher, for the sacrifices she made to send him to private school at her own expense.

Fascinating Discussion with Nick Gillespie and Patrick Byrne

At the Free State Project's 8th Annual Liberty Forum conference, a unique discussion took place when editor in chief of Reason.com and Reason TV, Nick Gillespie, sat down to chat to keynote speaker, Patrick Byrne, CEO of Overstock, in this intimate and fascinating interview.

Comparative Advantage for Economy and Career

haitian garment workers

This post originally appeared at e3ne.org.

All wealth comes from production and exchange: making and trading goods and services. The two are closely related: the more you trade, the more you’re able to produce. How does that work? Through the magic of specialization.

When you trade, you’re able to specialize in your comparative advantage, that is, what you can do relatively cheaply compared to everyone else. If you didn’t trade, you’d have to make everything yourself: clothes, food, shelter, transportation, health care, etc. You’d be very, very poor. By trading with other people, you can focus on doing one narrow thing really, really well, earning money, and trading that money away for other goods and services that other people focus on doing really, really well.

Love Shack? Nah, Sugar Shack, Baby

If you see a faded sign by the side of the road that says '15 Miles' to the... Sugar shack... stop, and enjoy! This weekend heralds the 20th Annual Maple Weekend. Join the fun at a local New Hampshire sugar house. Visit sugar makers to learn more about the centuries-old craft of maple sugaring. Meet your neighbors, and get some sweet tree gold while you are there. Insider tip: For the best maple syrup, go for dark... it's more flavorful and sticky-finger-licking good!

Photo credit: NH Maple Producers

Mover Story: Sarah Chamberlain

Community. The word always left a bad taste in my mouth. In my life, “community” has meant something awful, something dreadful. And by age 23, I knew that becoming part of a community was something I would fight to avoid at all costs.

I think it was just after September 11th 2001 when my confusion began. I was a theater major at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. When the towers fell, and the flags began to wave, I took solace in the sense of community I felt on campus. There, I was among people who seemed to understand the reality of what was actually happening. This was no War on Terror, but a war for profit; and the masses rallying behind it were getting swindled. It was tremendously comforting to know I was not alone, to know there were many others who had not fallen victim to this great hoax. These people called themselves liberals. So, I supposed I was a liberal too. Then, things began to change.

Early Movers on Education

Early mover Jody Underwood chats to Brett Veinotte, another early mover and founder of School Sucks Project.

Jody Underwood, Ph.D., is a founder and owner of Bardo Project and is one of the faces of Bardo Farm. She lives off the grid on a large property in New Hampshire with a varying number of people, depending on the season and the year, all learning back-to-basics skills. She moved to NH for the FSP in 2007 and is currently on the FSP board of directors. She focuses on K-12 education both professionally and as the chair of her local school board, which recently instituted school choice and included private schools as part of the choice (which is causing a stir in the state department of education). Her goal is to figure out ways to revolutionize education.

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